Samsung Galaxy Fold … ain’t going well

When Samsung announce the Galaxy Fold, and Huawei announced the Mate X, it’s becoming clear that foldable phone are either the future, or definitely something we’re going to see more in the future. Trouble is, these are all Generation 1 of this trend, and with such a trend, there’s going to be problems that arise along the way, and we think it’s fair to say Samsung are now feeling this.

Two problems

The problems with the Galaxy Fold seem to be attainable to two separate problems, one which is slightly more isolated, but a second which is perfectly understandable and an issue we hope, and evidence suggests is, will be made clearer to end users who get their Galaxy Folds.

1. Protective Layer … DON’T REMOVE IT!

You know the drill, you buy a brand new piece of Technology, and what do you find on the display, a protective film, and the first thing you do is remove it, right? … well, don’t if it’s a Galaxy Fold! Trouble is, there’s absolutely nothing in terms of warnings to tell you not to do this.

So, what happens if you remove this layer, I mean a bit less protection, that’s it right … well, not so much. Should you decide to even attempt to remove this layer, you’ll notice something pretty devastating happen to a piece of Technology costing around the £2,000 price mark, the display will literally fail, either entirely immediately, or progressively.

MKBHD removes the protector

Unlike most who removed the Layer entirely, MKBHD removed it whilst the display was on, then naturally noticed something wasn’t quite right fairly early.

You can see from the many unboxing videos online that Samsung don’t include any documentation, or anything, to suggest you shouldn’t remove the protector, however it does seem this is something that’s changing;

Des from T-Mobile tweeted message on consumer units

The above image was provided by Des, who works at T-Mobile USA, who shows the message that will be present on the covers that come with consumer units of the Galaxy Fold. Trouble with this message, however, is it’s similar to rather generic unimportant messages, so expect a lot of disappointed Fold users fairly early.

The bigger problem, which relates to further problems we’ll get to as well, is that if a reviewer has a problem with these devices, a free replacement is an e-mail away, whereas a real consumer who’s spend £2,000 of their hard earned money, will be having a fair less of a decent experience getting it sorted.

2. Wear and tear??

The second issue with the Galaxy Fold is from a far lesser number of units, where that same display will either show a line through it, have an unexplained bulge, or one that’s the most alarming, is that the display is already collecting a lot of dust under it causing problems.

Main take from all this, don’t buy a Galaxy Fold, or Mate X until Foldable technology improves. Whilst the Huawei device has yet to prove itself, it wouldn’t be too out there to expect early-day issues on that end as well.

Samsung statement

Samsung have released a statement to the press in relation to the following issues, which reads as follows;

A limited number of early Galaxy Fold samples were provided to media for review. We have received a few reports regarding the main display on the samples provided. We will thoroughly inspect these units in person to determine the cause of the matter.

Separately, a few reviewers reported having removed the top layer of the display causing damage to the screen. The main display on the Galaxy Fold features a top protective layer, which is part of the display structure designed to protect the screen from unintended scratches. Removing the protective layer or adding adhesives to the main display may cause damage. We will ensure this information is clearly delivered to our customers.

Samsung have been also very quick to state this is a relatively low number of users, and hope that any issues will be early production issues (in relation to 2), but time will tell. Here’s hoping we’re not on the start of another Note 7.

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